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Intricate Baroque Wigs…From Paper!

My love of all things paper is not a secret. I don’t exactly try to hide it either…haha If you walk around my apartment it’s pretty much devoted to showing off paper in its various forms: printed, bound, folded, and untouched (for future projects, of course.) It is because of this love affair that when I came across Russian artist Asya Kozina’s most recent work of creating Baroque wigs from paper I was truly stunned! I always knew that paper was capable of many wondrous things, but this was a new one. With Valentine’s Day in the near future and more than a bit of whimsy in the air, I simply fell in love with them.

Asya Kozina: Baroque 1

It doesn’t hurt that that she knows how to set the stage either. The models are put into period-esque clothes and while beautiful, take a step back so that the paper sculptures can shine. The photos themselves are also reminiscent of paintings or French La Mode magazine images. Wonderful from top to bottom!

If you love paper, history, fashion, and perhaps just feats of engineering, then this is the paper artist for you! Be sure to check out all of her work on her Behance site. She has made COMPLETE CLOTHES from paper. She’s my new hero!

Asya Kozina

Asya Kozina

Asya Kozina

Paper because…

As I was thumbing through my newest installment of National Geographic I came across the most intriguing ad. Being a graphic designer in marketing, I tend to look at the ads, even when I would rather ignore them and get to the good facts about some bizarre island that can’t be found that breeds a type of bird that has never been seen but that likes to sleep upside down. I truly love National Geographic. But I digress. I came across a rather simple, but colorful ad that with two people looking at a map, clearly dressed for the outdoors, with a headline that said, “Paper because a lot of places worth going don’t get a signal, and hopefully never will.” Whoa. That was simply my first reaction. I just couldn’t believe that here was an advertisement that wasn’t directly trying to get a graphic designer or office interested in their paper products and more importantly, it wasn’t in an industry magazine such as HOW, Communication Arts, etc. I was thrown for a happy loop!

As the shock finally wore off, I saw the logo in the bottom right hand corner. The ad was for Domtar Paper (here). Admittedly not my favorite paper company, but dang it, if this ad wasn’t turning my thoughts around. So as usual, I donned my research hat and starting poking around trying to find out more and Domtar was completely prepared. The ad I saw was only one advertisement of a whole campaign to battle the “go paperless” statement that seems to appear on anything paper or that could appear on paper, such as emails or bills. Well, no wonder. The “go paperless” campaign has been put forth by technology based companies to push their products, so it was only fair that the paper companies have the same chance to fight for their products. I applaud them, especially with something so creative. They have made Paper an entity on their site. There is even a letter from Paper to the audience, reminding them about how many great times they’ve had together and that they’ve been together for so very long. All very true statements.

Their website goes even further than just helping their audience fall back in love with paper. They have made some very poignant and rather socially pointed ads (see here) showing how leaving paper behind and going completely forth with technology based forms of communication might indeed be hurtful to society, both socially, historically, financially, and environmentally. Then, making sure that they’re not getting too serious with their cause, they have made some very funny short videos (see here) likening paper to drugs, what would actually happen if paper was rationed, and then taking it even further that is the world goes completely “paperless” what would you use to…um…take care of things in the bathroom.

Here is one of my favorite videos…

It is no secret that I love paper. For years now I have been collecting everything printed ephemera from books, menus, postcards, gift tags, signs, and just sheets of paper from around the world. It’s a fascinating concept to me that something that is so seemingly fragile can last for a thousand years. I recently heard a startling fact that the Library of Congress put forth. They stated that in 100 years all of the current, digital archives that they have will be corrupt and no longer useable. Say what? Yet the Gutenberg Bible, which is not even the oldest form of paper in archive currently is 562 years old (give or take a decade) and is still in near perfect condition. Hello people??? I’m not sure we need much more proof than that that paper is not something we should be getting rid of anytime soon. How are people, 500 years from now going to know what life was like during this time if there is nothing to find? I’m just not entirely sure we’re completely thinking to our future with this “go paperless” concept.

Now before I get an onslaught of comments about being environmentally friendly, and recycling, and not wasting, I completely agree. We as society need to be responsible paper users. Do you always need to print that email? Probably not. If a child makes one small mark on a paper, should they just throw it away and start over? Nope, just turn it over or heaven forbid you erase the mark with an eraser. On a pencil. Remember those? Anyways, that’s a whole other irk of mine. There are ways to continue to use paper and trees and be responsible about it.

So in a world where the pressures to completely forget about paper, I truly applaud Domtar Paper for attempting to inform, raise questions, and entertain me with their new campaign. They can count one more among their supporters. My name is Abigail Steinem and I’m a paper lover. Hail paper!

Name that font! Go!

Fonts have gone a little crazy. It seems like anyone can take a stab at making their own font these days. Then they put it out there for people to use, over and over again. Then someone takes it and makes a bastardized version with only a small change and it has a whole new name. It’s sometimes very hard to make sense of which font is named what.

Now think about fonts that weren’t even made with a computer in mind. There is no uploading a named font file to your computer that archives the newly arrived font. Nope, all you have is a block of type high wood with a letter lovingly carved out of it. There is no stamp to identity it’s name and you only have one of them. No other letters to compare to find similarities and differences. All is lost, correct? Happily the answer is no! Not all is lost!

There is a wonderful blog called Letterpress Daily that is run by a former educator/friend of mine, David Wolske. I have never met another person so in tune with a letterpress machine and specifically the letter forms used to print on them. Each post he puts a wonderful picture of the wood letter and then the printed version. It makes me grin ear-to-ear every time I see it! This blog not only educates printers, students, and enthusiasts, but gives you an archive to start your own investigating work of finally figuring out what the heck that wood font is called that has been sitting on your shelf for years! I bet if you sent him a picture, he might even know what it is named!

At this rate, you might never get through all of his posts, but then that just means you always have something entertaining and informative to read each day!

To view his website, click here!